Paternity


PATERNITY


If you have a question about paternity legal issues please call Boehmer Law to speak with our child custody and family law attorneys who represent clients in all aspects of paternity cases. Our skilled and knowledgeable lawyers have extensive experience in matters of paternity, and we work hard to see that your interests are fully protected. Our award-winning attorneys are here, ready to fight for you and your rights. Boehmer Law is a law firm you can count on to work hard on your behalf and we are dedicated to success. Call Boehmer Law today at 636-896-4020 to make your free consultation visit with regards to any paternity matters.  

The laws surrounding the establishment of paternity as well as its rights and duties are very complicated. If you have any questions about proving or disproving paternity for a child please call Boehmer Law today at 636-896-4020. Your consultation visit is free and confidential—we will listen to the facts of your case and advise you on what we believe to be the best course of action.  

Our clients in these types of cases include:

• Unmarried men who are being deprived of a relationship or visitation to their children by a mother
• Mothers who are trying to establish paternity to secure child support
• Assumed or alleged fathers who refute any biological relation to the child

Our paternity issues lawyers represent and help our clients on all sides of paternity issues. We know the law, we know your rights, and we will fight hard on your behalf because we understand what is at stake.

Call for your free consultative appointment today at 636-896-4020. We are conveniently located off Boones Lick Road in St. Charles, MO—let us get working for you!

 Paternity means fatherhood. Establishing paternity of a child is the process of determining that a man is or is not a child’s father. In the state of Missouri a man is presumed to be the father of a child if:

(1) He and the child's natural mother are or have been married to each other and the child is born during the marriage, or within three hundred days after the marriage is terminated by death, annulment, declaration of invalidity, or dissolution, or after a decree of separation is entered by a court; 
or
(2) Before the child's birth, he and the child's natural mother have attempted to marry each other by a marriage solemnized in apparent compliance with the law, although the attempted marriage is or may be declared invalid, and:

(a) If the attempted marriage may be declared invalid only by a court, the child is born during the attempted marriage or within three hundred days after its termination by death, annulment, declaration of invalidity or dissolution; or

(b) If the marriage is invalid without a court order, the child is born within three hundred days after the termination of cohabitation; or

(3) After the child's birth, he and the child's natural mother have married or attempted to marry each other by a marriage solemnized in apparent compliance with law, although the marriage is or may be declared invalid, and:

(a) He has acknowledged his paternity of the child in writing filed with the bureau; or

(b) With his consent, he is named as the child's father on the child's birth certificate; or

(c) He is obligated to support the child pursuant to a written voluntary promise or by court order; or

(4) An expert concludes that the blood tests show that the alleged parent is not excluded and that the probability of paternity is ninety-eight percent or higher, using a prior probability of 0.5.

2. A presumption pursuant to this section may be rebutted in an appropriate action only by clear and convincing evidence, except that a presumption under subsection 1 of this section that arises from a blood test or the filing of an acknowledgment of paternity in a state or territory in which the blood test or the filing creates a conclusive presumption by law also has conclusive effect in Missouri. If two or more presumptions arise which conflict with each other, the presumption which on the facts is founded on the weightier considerations of policy and logic controls. The presumption is rebutted by a court decree establishing the paternity of the child by another man.
**Missouri Revised Statutes; Chapter 210 Child Protection and Reformation; Presumption of paternity--rebuttal of presumption, standard of proof. 

If a mother and presumed father of a child don't agree about the identity of the child's father, paternity can established with genetic testing or through a court action. According to Missouri Revised statutes evidence relating to paternity may include:

(1) Evidence of sexual intercourse between the mother and the alleged father during the possible time of conception of the child;

(2) An expert's opinion concerning the probability of the alleged father's paternity of the child based upon the duration of the mother's pregnancy;

(3) Blood test results, weighed in accordance with the evidence of the statistical probability of the alleged father's paternity of the child;

(4) Medical or anthropological evidence relating to the alleged father's paternity of the child based on tests performed by experts; and

(5) All other evidence relevant to the issue of the paternity of the child.

**Missouri Revised Statutes; Chapter 210; Evidence relating to paternity.


Missouri does provide for a statute of limitations on paternity. More information about that is located here: 


Keep in mind that establishing paternity gives children who are born outside of a marriage the same rights to benefits and financial support given to children born of a marriage. Determining paternity makes sure that either parent can request child support from the other party. Paternity can also allow a child to be placed on their father’s insurance policy and allows that child to inherit and receive Social Security and Veteran’s benefits on the father's record, if such benefits exist. If a father does not try to legally establish his paternity, he could lose rights to custody or visitation with his child(ren). He may also lose the right to future legal proceedings that could determine who will care for the child.


If you have a question about paternity legal issues please call Boehmer Law to speak with our child custody and family law attorneys who represent clients in all aspects of paternity cases. Our skilled and knowledgeable lawyers have extensive experience in matters of paternity, and we work hard to see that your interests are fully protected. Our award-winning attorneys are here, ready to fight for you and your rights. Boehmer Law is a law firm you can count on to work hard on your behalf and we are dedicated to success. Call Boehmer Law today at 636-896-4020 to make your free consultation visit with regards to any paternity matters.  

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